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Wayne
 #21 

I think there is room for improvement in the design of slab rock saws. I believe water would do the trick if it was supplied at the cut. Water "slips" the blade before it gets to the cut by being thin, and how many other machines that saws don't have the coolant at the cut? Even many cab machines wet the wheels from the bottom! I think someone in lapidary design missed the boat when it came to coolant. But, as high priced as the equipment is, I guess the trade-off is to use an oil-type coolant and set-up over the price of stainless?
Do they even make a stainless blade bigger than 10"?
Tom K
 #22 
Wayne,
There are some slab saws that have the lube feed right at both sides of the blade.
They have a small sump the recirculates the oil through tubing or hoses.

They also have a guard over the blade that looks kinda like a fender from a bike.This gives maximum lube right where you want it.

Tom K.
Wayne
 #23 

Tom,
The ones I've seen are "swing-arm" type like the masons use.

Have you finished the saw you were rebuilding?
Mike Streeter
 #24 
Hi Dave,

I got my mineral oil at Tractor Supply in the equine department - comes in 1-gallon containers. It seems to work fine in my 12" saw.

Mike
Tom K
 #25 
Mike,
The poor guy wants to lube his saw not give it an enema!!!

Tom K.
Tom K
 #26 
Wayne,
Raytech used to make saws with the sump/lube system but I don't think you can buy them anymore.
You can buy kits for just about any saw though.

...............................................................

Taken from:

http://gemstoneworld.com/hardware/saws1.htm

Mult-Stage Filter and Recirculation System for Slab Saws

We've improved and enlarged the coolant recirculating systems for our saws and have made them available in kits for use on most other large slab saws as well. The system can move large volumes of clean oil over the cutting surface of the saw blade to keep it cool and lubricated. The holding tanks are heavy duty plastic with multiple settling chambers to filter out particles from the coolant. The tank and submersible pump are easily cleaned.

Specifications for systems for TR Series saws approximate those given below for separate kits available for other large slab saws.

The kits contain submersible pump, coolant tank, hose and fittings. Systems will fit most saws and are easily installed using common hand tools.

Tanks for 14" - 24" saws hold approximately 15 gallons and measure 17"W x 22"L x 12" H.
Comes with lid.

Tanks for 30" - 36" saws hold approximately 30 gallons and measure 18"W x 24"L x 18" H.
Comes with lid.


You can make your own system without much trouble at all.

Tom K.
OOPS!! (Wayne)
 #27 
Wayne,
I forgot to reply about my saw project!

No I haven't worked on the saw at all but hope to now that I am retired and have the time.

I need one more part which is the main shaft for the feed.I didn't have time to do it in work so now I will either buy a new one or farm the job out to someone who works for free,,,,like I did!!

It's still pretty much buried under and around by our youngest daughters "stuff" but I've been making subtle remarks about it so it may just be "taken care of" one way or the other!!!!

I doubt if this area is zoned for Warehouse Storage so I may just go and have myself arrested and let the "Law" do my cleaning for me!!!

An anonymous tip from a pay phone to the local cops may do the trick????

Kids,,,,,,,,Ya gotta loveum!!

Tom K.
Wayne
 #28 

Tom,

I sure miss not working in a fab shop to have the use of the tools for "side work"! I guess the company I worked for about 4 years ago was about the best to do side work. The company, Applied Technology Group, made automated machines for industrial applications. They had a complete machine shop and fabrication capability, doing mostly food grade equipment, stainless steel was the metal we used most. I made a lot of side projects for the owner/engineer, in return he gave me total use of all the equipment for my projects. He had other "side projects" that resulted in the company going out of business. But, I did work there long enough to rough-out the metal for two cab machines, two burnout ovens, and a few other pieces of equipment for a lapidary shop. A large slap saw was next in line to be made, but I ran out of time! Plans was made to make an 18" to 24" slab saw... all stainless, and I'm talking about every nut, bolt, bearings, and all! If a Covington 24" cost over $4,000.00, what would a total stainless one be worth!?
Wayne
 #29 

Tom,

Kids!? Yeah, we put up with them for "some reason"!?

Email received from Tonya this morning...

"HAPPY FATHER'S DAY TO THE BESTEST DADDY IN THE WHOLE WIDE WORLD!!! I LOVE YOU!!!!
I HAVE TO WORK FROM NOON TIL 6PM TODAY. I'LL BE SURE TO TELL YOU HAPPY FATHER'S DAY ON THE AIR. I MIGHT AS WELL TAKE ADVANTAGE OF 100,000 WATTS TO DO THAT....

I HOPE YOU HAVE A GREAT DAY! I'LL CALL YOU THIS AFTERNOON WHILE I'M AT WORK! I lOVE YOU TOO MOMMA!!!!

TONYA"

Tom K
 #30 
Wayne,
I don't know what a stainless steel slab would cost but Tommy made me a ss cover for my 18" and material alone at his cost was over $250.00 !
Yeah I really miss the machines in work not only for my jobs but I did a LOT of jobs for others who either didn't know how or didn't have that access!

As a matter of fact,the last job I did was to re-design and make a new feed engagement assembly for a guy from Utah who bought an old Highland Park saw and couldn't afford the assembly!

HP made a pretty darn rugged machine but I'll garrantee ya mine will never break or wear out like theirs did!

I'm not all that crazy about my new status being like my Uncle Rube trying to work with stock out of Fred Sanford's back yard but when I think of what I went through in work with them no good,rotten SOB's, it brings me back to my senses and I make due with what I have!

Oh by the way.The Union got me a BIG pension raise Saturday at a meeting!!! I stayed in "work status" to get this raise as the new contract was up Saturday!!

The Steel Workers Union or The Pittsburgh Pirates as we call them (main headquarters are in PA) got me a big $16.00/month raise,,,,,,,,and that's before taxes!!! GO UNION!!! LOL I was kinda worried about the cost of gas to and from NC in July but with this raise me and the Mrs.are in clover!!

................................................................

Kids,

Yeah they have a way of "gettin to us" one way or the other!!

Tom K.
Bob Johannes
 #31 
I use Almag but to cut down on the mist I use Raytech Mist inhibitor which reduces the mist from the saw by almost 100%. I can open the saw as soon as the blade stops and there is no mist so I'm not breathing the Almag.

Hard to find but a small amount last for a long time and doesn't break down

Bob Johannes
The Amethyst Rose
Grampa Trees
 #32 
Howdy yall,
I like to use just plain ole veggie oil I get at the food wholesaler here in town. To keep the mist down you can add a tad of motor oil. Works great and if you don't add the motor oil its non toxic. I live outside in the desert so I don't mind the mist.
Wayne
 #33 
Tom,

Been looking for a metal lathe without much luck, most that are for sale are in the North or on the west coast. I think the Rebs are holding on to the ones they have, just in case another "War" breaks out!

Hey! With that "big raise" you'll be able to recover your gas money to NC... in about three years!!
Joe D.
 #34 
I only use water with a squirt of saw lubricant for my Genie trim saw. The saw blade is Copper, I believe. I always clean and dry eveything when I'm done. The Genie blade cuts anything I ever came across and won't cut your hand. It does a nice job on your nails though, if you let them come into contact with the edge (I believe I read somewhere that our nails are made of Apatite, no wonder some folks chew them). The blade is very expensive so I have learned to be careful of it and even taught myself how to straighten it when I don't heed the directions.

Joe D.
bralex
 #35 
I've never understood why diamond blades and saws aren't made from stainless and aluminum. They're bloody expensive anyway, why not add a bit and eliminate the rust problem? One of my long-term projects is to replace most of the parts of my 18" HP with SS and Aluminum.

As a note, I want to be using my saw to trim large mineral specimens, not for lapidary slabbing. Cleaning up the oil is both more important and harder for these than for most slabbing materials.

Cheers,
Scott

PS at this point I'm using water with rust inhibitors that don't do too much to stop the rust...also coating non-moving surfaces with LPS-3, a sort of spray wax.
Phil
 #36 
"I've never understood why diamond blades and saws aren't made from stainless and aluminum."

Stainless is too hard, and aluminun is too soft. The metal has to have the right ductility for the diamonds to embed and remain there.

bralex
 #37 
My comment may have seemed flippant but...

Most normal grades of aluminum are, of course, too soft for blades; I was referring there to the saw components. That said, there are many grades of both stainless and aluminum, and a number of ways to bond / embed diamond to the disk. I'm hard pressed to believe that there is no reasonable choice other than carbon steel.

I've seen 3 main ways to "attach" the diamond - roll it directly into the surface of the blade, notches perpendicular to the blade, and a notch parallel to the blade (along the perimeter of the blade). The notches are then pressed closed to seal in the diamond powder. Stainless sucks to machine (at least the varieties I've messed with) but shouldn't be too hard to notch. Would it wear quickly enough for use in a blade? Not sure. Maybe time to mess around...hmm.

Scott
Dean Young
 #38 
White Oils (mineral oil) are what is recommended for rock saws.
Safe and easy to clean after the cut. Do not use antifreeze or trany fluid- for your own good.
Chevron Superla #9 would work best as the flash point is 365F
and the viscocity range is 15-85. The price is about $4/gal.
Dwayne
 #39 
My Uncle is in the rock business and has cut tons of rocks has 4 or 5 big saws going all the time. He uses environmentally safe RV Antifreeze and has had no problems with toxins or residue. It has worked well over the years.
Harry
 #40 
Concerning the comment by Harry Polly about automatic transmission fluid use in a saw - check the MSDS (Material Safety Data
Sheet) on the type of tranny fluid you are using. The fluid I use is completely harmless, you could drink the stuff. I was a safety director for 12 years with a large manufacturing company and I'm very familiar with MSDS info. Many people labor under the misconception that it must be harmful, it's an oil - not so.
Nuff Said.
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