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  Author   Comment  
Christopher P.
 #1 
Found this strange green stone on the Southern Oregon Coast, almost think its a form of jade. A magnet with stick strong to the dark inclusions in the stone. Any ideas what it might be?


Christopher P
 #2 
a magnet will stick strong*
Harry Polly
 #3 
Chris,  if a magnet will stick to the black area, then you have magnetite.  I suspect the green is probably peridot, epidote, or jade.  It will all depend on the hardness of the green.  Epidote is one of the associated minerals found with magnetite,  but the bright green gives suspicion of one of the others.  also.
Keith Peregrine
 #4 
I agree with Harry, Jade.  Where along the coast did you collect this piece?  That should give you a better clue of the mineral.  The strong magnetic quality of the rock does suggest magnetite.  Given that Jade and magnetite are associated with subduction zone geology, Jade makes sense.  There is a possibility that the magnetic material might be chromite, though this is weakly magnetic.  Both might be present.

Anyway, it is a very impressive looking rock, especially how the light passes through it.

Cheers,

Keith
jaybates
 #5 
Probably not nephrite from the Oregon coast.  I would guess serpentine with magnetite inclusions.  Do a scratch test for hardness. Nephrite will not scratch from an ordinary knife glass but will scratch from a quartz crystal. If it does not scratch from an ordinary knife blade but does scratch from a quartz crystal then do a specific gravity test. Nephrite has a specific gravity of around 2.95. I have been told there is no nephrite in Oregon by people who live in Oregon and know their rocks.  
lapidaryrough
 #6 

To all Oregon rock hounds on Cannon Beach Oregon. Do not collect  The Jadeite / Nephrite ......

The material isn't their.  Thank you  Jay Bates. Along oregon coast from the  Fraser  river Canada south you'll fine jadeite and nephrite. Washington coast along Westport bay south face there is some of the best beach hunting on the north American coast! for silicate  life forms. including Mr. Bates...

 

 

Colin
 #7 
It will be a serpentine with magnetite inclusions.
gemdragon
 #8 
I agree with Colin and Jay. All manner of serpentines are found on the southern Oregon coast and many are quite beautiful and spotted....more are just dark green. The higher quality ones are translucent like that one . [smile]
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