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Seth William Rozendaal
 #1 
Hello!

My name is Seth William Rozendaal, and this is my first post to this board, so I would like to introduce myself.

I have spent the last three and a half years collecting red beryl in an effort to demonstrate that gem-grade material in this mineral variety is actually a Red Emerald.  The mineral is a red beryl, but the gemstone is a red emerald, just as a green emerald is also a green beryl.

No beryl discovered in history has been more like our familiar green than the red one, and in any case, a crimson variety of the green stone which is one of the oldest admired by humanity is BIG NEWS which has been overshadowed by traditional attachments to a mineral name completely unknown to the average person.

The collection I have assembled is unlike any that has ever been put together, even by the former owners of the mine.  I have four floater crystals larger than any they found in the first 25 years of mining, and I have faceted three stones larger than five carat, even though all mining operations before were only able to facet one of 4.5 carat. 

I am not selling anything, and have only put this together for the enjoyment of ALL gem and mineral fans so they may see how magnificent this jewel really is...the color of the finest rubies is displayed magnificently in the body of an emerald.

I have set up this display in a public education booth at the TGMS show, which runs through Sunday February 12th in Tucson.  If you can't see for yourself, do not despair!  I have collected this information and photographs in a FREE book you can download at http://www.TheRedEmerald.com

Come look, see and know.

Mike Streeter
 #2 
Hey Seth,

Whether one chooses to call it Red Beryl (my preference) or Red Emerald, it sure is a beautiful and unique mineral.  Thanks for sharing the very interesting information!

Mike
Unregistered
 #3 
Hi Seth thank you for sharing  this with us all. I have a few Red Beryls my self from UT. 

KOR Carl from WI
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