McRocks is not a club and therefore has no membership requirements.
No matter if you are an experienced or newbie rockhound,
we encourage all good people to post messages on McRocks.
The only stupid question here is the one you don't ask!

 
Click the following picture for an illustrated
tutorial on how to post images on the board.

Please don't use IMAGESHACK.US to post images.
Other image hosting internet services are OK.

For tons more rockhounding information:

Welcome to McRocks!
Your hosts, Mike & Chrissy Streeter

Attention Mozilla Firefox Users
Since a login is not required for this message board,
it is totally secure. However, if you're still concerned
about security, you can click on the following link
Click here for McRocks Secure Message Board

 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Jonathan
 #1 
I went fossil hunting today and found some really neat stuff! I am completely new to fossil & rock hounding. I am not completely what this is. There is a trail where is looks like it "dug" or "swam" then it died and fossilized. It is kind of rough but any advice on cleaning it?


Thank you

Attached Images
Click image for larger version - Name: IMAG0265.jpg, Views: 99, Size: 32.87 KB 

Jonathan
 #2 
#2

Attached Images
Click image for larger version - Name: IMAG0266.jpg, Views: 86, Size: 53.77 KB 

Jonathan
 #3 
The "legs or fins" are thin but longer and its hard to see them in the pic but they are there. If it helps, I found this in a slab of shale.
Bob Harman
 #4 
This 6 year old thread had no responses.

The MOST IMPORTANT piece of information is missing. WHERE WAS THE EXAMPLE FOUND?
  Without that, little educated guesses are possible. When you have the place of origin, the type of rock (geology) and age of the rock layers can be most helpful.   In any case, if found in much of the East and Midwest, the find, if indeed a fossil in the first place, would likely be an invertebrate animal. Some primitive sharks can be found in some localities, but much of fossil bearing rock in the eastern 2/3rds of the US is just too old for bony fishes, amphibians, lizards etc to occur.     BOB
Bob Harman
 #5 
Based on the pictures, I have very serious doubts that the example is a fossil of any type. But, for the purposes of this discussion, let's assume that it is and let's assume it was found where vertebrate fossils (not the eastern US where fossils are largely of invertebrate types) might be found.  In the US that might be in states East of the Rocky Mountains such as western Nebraska and Kansas, the Dakotas and eastern Montana and Wyoming. Also in parts of Utah, maybe eastern Idaho and possibly a few additional localities.

Anyway, the original poster has depicted a small "vertebrate fossil" with fossilized "eyes" !!!!!????  I am sure the museums would like to see that!  Soft parts of small animals virtually never fossilize. That is why you only see the remains of worm burrows (trace fossils) and not the worms themselves. And that is why you can easily find shark teeth, but only rarely find the remains of the shark as they are cartilaginous fish with no bony parts.   

BOB


Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.

Return to Message Index Page

 

 

LINKS

US & STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEYS
MEMORABLE MESSAGE BOARD PICTURES
McROCKS PHOTO ALBUM
FIELD TRIP REPORTS
MINERAL IDENTIFICATION KEY II
MINDAT.ORG
IMAGE POSTING TUTORIAL
ROCK & GEM MAGAZINE
GEMHUNTER'S McROCKHOUND LINKS
McROCKHOUND BIOGRAPHIES