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Donna Dick
 #1 
I'm excited about a very unusual stone that I found at KY Lake this past weekend. This stone is known by many names (Hagstone, Holystone, Witch stone, Adderstone).

The river is drawn down to winter pool; thus exposing many specimens that would normally be covered by water. I found 2 other hagstones as well, but my daughter insisted she needed them to keep the witches at bay (ha ha).

Just for FUN, here's a little history behind the Hagstone:

One of the most widespread magic devices to protect both man and beast was a pebble with a natural hole in it, also called ‘hagstone’, ‘witch-stone’, or (in the north-east) ‘adder-stones’. They were believed to repel witchcraft, and consequently any disease caused by spells or the evil eye; in particular, they prevented hag-riding. The earliest allusion is in a 15th-century charm against nightmares.

Small ones could be carried in the pocket or hung up over the bed; larger ones were used in stables over Horses to prevent witches from riding the horses at night and bringing them back sweating and frothy.

A variation, still known in the mid-20th century, was to hang the stone on the stable door; usually the doorkey or a bit of old chain would be attached to it, reinforcing its power with that of iron.

Boatmen in Weymouth fastened them to the bows as charms to keep their boats safe. Small fossil sponges of the species Porosphaera are commonly found with natural holes in them; in Victorian times, necklaces of them were sold ‘for luck’ in Brighton (Sussex), and were much worn by women of fishing families.

Some cultures believed that you could see Fairies or goblins by looking through the hole in the stone.

Attached Images
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jay bates
 #2 
Donna, I would guess those are net weights the Indians used for fishing. I would guess they have magical powers imbued by the native Americans rather than witches. Put one in your pocket next time you go fishing and see how many more fish you catch.
Elmer McElreath
 #3 
Donna,
Any stone with a history is a great find. Whether man or nature made ie; The Hope Diamond. A story that goes with the stone makes it a "special" find.
Elmer..........KOR
Tom K.
 #4 
Pretty neat Donna,,,,

Thanks!
Rob Townsend
 #5 
Just goes to show, a good rockhound will always find something on an outing! next time I get skunked I'll look for hag stones.
Kors
Rob
sherri
 #6 
Thanks for the great story! I love stories like that. Now I have to go online and research hag stones. Really fun! They could be fishing weights made be indians as the holes are almost perfect..but I like your story better. Half the battle is believing! Thanks again.
sherri
 #7 
found this on my search:

Hag Stone


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Hag Stone is a stone with a hole through it, which is believed to ward off the dead. In European, this stone keeps the "evil hag" spirit away in order to prevent her from stealing horses and children. (see Hag) The hag stone is especially used as a favorite talisman by Cunning Folk to dispel the evil eye. Other people hang this stone in bedrooms to prevent the succubus-hag from ridding on people's chests during nightmares.

In Italian Witchcraft the holed stone is associated with fairies, and often referred as the holy stone. It is considered a doorway, or key to the doorway, into the fairy kingdom. It Italian folk magic, it is believed these stones have the power to bind a fairy to one's service for a length of time.
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